Tag Archives: top tips

Editor Opinions: Secrets of UEA Accommodation

It may seem a bit daunting living in student accommodation, especially if you didn’t get your first choice, or if you haven’t spent all that much time away from home before! Our editors have compiled a list of hints and tips to help you survive your first few weeks in halls, telling you what to expect, and when to expect a cleaner banging on the door after an LCR night. Continue reading Editor Opinions: Secrets of UEA Accommodation

Editor Opinions: Things We wish We’d known Before Starting UEA

Freshers has arrived!

You probably feel more than a little nervous and definitely unprepared but don’t fear because we’re here to help.

Some of our editors have banded together to give you the tips you need before things start to get serious, telling you our top advice for surviving your first few weeks at UEA that we wish we’d known in our first year!

Continue reading Editor Opinions: Things We wish We’d known Before Starting UEA

8 Reasons to keep Apple Cider Vinegar in your cupboard

By Alyssa Ollivier-Tabukashvili

So you’re thinking about staple items for your home. Maybe apple cider vinegar (ACV) comes to mind or maybe it doesn’t. but when you’re buying cleaning products, shampoos, maybe health supplements, surely you’d like a 3 (or 8) in 1? Here is a great list of just some of the uses of ACV for day to day to usage.

First of all, remember not to consume this without diluting it as the acidity may burn your throat, so mix 2 tablespoons of vinegar with a cup of water. You can buy it organic for £1.60 at Sainsbury’s and can also use it in foods such as salad dressings, soups, or as a replacement for lemon or for eggs in baking.

Increases the benefits of your vitamins and minerals: if your stomach is not producing enough acid, it cannot absorb all of the nutrients. With the help of the ACV, you’ll be benefiting even more from your consumption of fruits and salads.

Fuels intense exercise: acetic acid helps your muscles turn carbs into energy, so for the athletes and sports-people, consume it before the night-before carb load.

It can kill many types of bacteria: ACV has been used as a preservative, as it prevents bacteria, such as e.coli, from growing in the food. Cleaning fruits and veg with a small amount of the diluted substance and then rinsing it off is a sure way of having clean fruit and potentially prolonging its life (without the acidic taste).

Lowers blood sugar levels and in turn, helps fight diabetes. (Blood sugar levels should be kept stable regardless). Before bed, it can help reduce fasting blood sugars by 4%.

Healthy hair and skin: Mix ½ tbsp. of the vinegar with a cup of cold water in a bottle and use as a rinse after shampooing several times a week to get a healthy hair shine. Alternatively, dab on your face with a cotton ball to act as a toner, as it will help regulate the pH of your skin. (This may not work for all skin types, and the acidity may aggravate the skin instead of helping – especially if it’s not diluted enough).

House cleaning: To clean those pesky student kitchens, mix ½ cup vinegar with a cup of water and use to clean surfaces, windows, microwaves and glasses. (Distilled vinegar is also highly recommendable).

Softens the energy crash: Apple cider vinegar may alleviate the sudden crash from carbohydrates and sugars by slowing the rush of sugar to the bloodstream.

Clear your blocked nose: Apple cider vinegar contains vitamins B1, A and E, along with minerals Potassium and Magnesium which work to thin the mucus and clear your sinuses. This is especially helpful before bed when the cold is keeping you up.

For more information, check out:

http://www.cosmopolitan.com/health-fitness/a48500/apple-cider-vinegar-benefits/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11435516

https://authoritynutrition.com/6-proven-health-benefits-of-apple-cider-vinegar/

http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/30/11/2814.full

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/apple-cider-vinegar-miracle-for-home-and-body.html

Editors note: People can react differently to different food products and some may experience allergic reactions. All health advice given in The Broad is intended in good faith and is to be taken at the readers discretion.

Image from Unsplash, by Ashim D’Silva