Tag Archives: Opinion

What I learned from solo travelling

by Rachel Glaves 

Travelling is something special that everyone should experience. Solo travelling around Europe (Amsterdam, Rome, Athens and Crete) for two weeks was without a doubt the best thing I have ever done. I am a newcomer and therefore no expert when it comes to solo travelling, but I definitely learned and gained a thing or two from my experience. Continue reading What I learned from solo travelling

Editor Opinions: Secrets of UEA Accommodation

It may seem a bit daunting living in student accommodation, especially if you didn’t get your first choice, or if you haven’t spent all that much time away from home before! Our editors have compiled a list of hints and tips to help you survive your first few weeks in halls, telling you what to expect, and when to expect a cleaner banging on the door after an LCR night. Continue reading Editor Opinions: Secrets of UEA Accommodation

Editor Opinions: Things We wish We’d known Before Starting UEA

Freshers has arrived!

You probably feel more than a little nervous and definitely unprepared but don’t fear because we’re here to help.

Some of our editors have banded together to give you the tips you need before things start to get serious, telling you our top advice for surviving your first few weeks at UEA that we wish we’d known in our first year!

Continue reading Editor Opinions: Things We wish We’d known Before Starting UEA

On the edge or cutting edge? What does UEA think of the new library statue?

By Natalie Froome

UEA have hit the headlines with the controversial placing of a new Anthony Gormley statue.

The art installation is a human statue, which has been placed on the very edge of the library roof. Some are calling the statue ‘edgy’ and think it a great addition to UEA’s sculpture trail, while others have berated the University for their bad taste.

We talked to UEA Students to get the picture of what students think about it… Continue reading On the edge or cutting edge? What does UEA think of the new library statue?

Where Do You Start With Jeremy Corbyn

By Tony Allen 

Unsuitable to be a leader, or just the tonic that British politics needs right now? Future Prime Minister, or the man who could drag Labour into oblivion? The reality is, no-one will know until the next election. but here’s why I believe he is the man to lead both Labour and Britain to a better future

First and (perhaps) foremost, people can identify with Corbyn. Of course he’s not perfect. But he’s served his time in the Labour Party and has a wealth of experience to draw upon. He knows what it’s like to be a party member and little-known backbencher both in government and opposition, knowledge that could be crucial in the period up to the next election, and could well also make him a better Prime Minister. His whipping power would consequently be extremely useful in forming a stable government and party from the grass roots up.

I suppose the main reason I wanted to write in support of Corbyn is this: I am an ordinary, lay person in terms of politics. Beyond studying the subject at A Level and making use of Charles Clarke’s public lectures at UEA, like much of the active electorate I am interested but no expert. I personally feel more sympathetic towards Corbyn as a leader than anyone else in modern politics. This trend is repeated up and down the country. A sixty-seven year old man is whipping up a fervour among many people (especially the young) in Britain, so why not give him a chance?

Anyone with even a passing interest in current affairs will remember the emotion around Corbyn’s election as party leader. I myself was halfway through Sixth Form and I felt real hope after watching the results as they were announced live on TV. Labour members had not just elected a new leader, they had voted for a change in their party and a new movement.

Many people who hadn’t been for a long time were genuinely excited about politics and after the great participatory event that was the EU referendum, they could be again.

As for the criticisms of the £3 registered supporters who got Corbyn elected? Well, I see their voices as being just as valid as any regular member of the Labour Party. After all, if Labour are to be the party of the working people, they need to allow as many people as possible a say in policymaking. I can’t help but think that some critics of the Labour leadership electoral system have lost sight of what it means to be socialist at a time when Labour needs to reinvent itself, regroup and assert its position in the British political spectrum. And no-one has a mandate to lead the party like Corbyn does.

Our MP Clive Lewis is a major supporter of Corbyn, and it is unsung heroes in the party like him who hold the key to Labour’s future success, not the loud figures like Chuka Umunna seemingly interested primarily in their own interests. Corbyn loyalists withstood the tense moments when resignations were ten-a-penny from his shadow cabinet. Having remained resolute throughout that, those who remain are now perfectly equipped for taking the fight to a more obvious adversary.

Admittedly, polling isn’t always great in terms of Corbyn’s personal popularity. However, if you’d have listened to the pollsters, the Conservatives would have been nowhere near a majority in 2015 and the UK would have voted by an overwhelming majority to remain in the EU.

Image: “Jeremy Corbyn” by Garry King is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.

The Music That Made Me

By Frances Butler

I think we often underestimate the power of music.

We all too rarely consider music as something that surrounds us, defines moments in our lives and is the life of so many. On that note, I decided to revisit a band I haven’t had a good listen to for about 2 years: Black Veil Brides. The name alone is enough to gain an exclamation of happiness, disgust or puzzled indifference – depending on whether you know who they are, and then, of course, whether you hate them or not. They are a band that have successfully managed to polarise the majority of alternative music fans; mostly due to their appearance, oddly enough, and not what actually matters – the music itself.

It’s only when I chose to come back to this band to see where they are now, that I realised, a good five years since I first listened to them, how much I appreciate the inspiration and strength their music not only gave me, but still continues to give to many others.

I remember being frequently made fun of for my music taste, especially when I mentioned this band. As insecure as I sometimes felt, I learned to care a lot less about what other people thought and trust myself a lot more.

They’ve made the journey all bands and artists strive for – from a small local following, not being taken seriously (for their image; dismissed as ‘posers’ and Motley Crüe or KISS rip-offs) and a debut album that was relatively unheard of, to having recognition by major labels (Universal), 4 albums and thousands of fans.

How did they do it?

By believing in themselves, having ambition, and quite frankly not caring one bit about any negative opinions of them.

I’ll remember them for being the particular band that, even though I don’t choose to listen to them anymore, are still capable of stirring up memories of gaining a sense of identity, self-belief, and proving your doubters wrong – and that is something everyone can relate to.