Tag Archives: Netflix

Star Trek: Discovery, Season 1, Part 1 Review

By Luke Farnish

Star Trek, the optimistic space-western featuring Captain Kirk and co. aired more than fifty years ago and various iterations of the show have graced the silver screen ever since, with a hiatus in the 1970s and early 1980s. However, with the last episode of the adventure to the final frontier airing in 2005, an entire generation of fans have been devoid of new Trek. So, when in November 2015 CBS announced a new series, fans were understandably excited.

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Netflix Originals Reviews: A Series of Unfortunate Events

 

By Gabriela Williams

Following its massive success with Stranger Things, Netflix is adding to its collection of originals with a new TV adaptation of A Series of Unfortunate Events with a set of eight, hour long episodes ready to watch now.

The plot of each episode stays closely to the original plot of the books, unlike the film adaptation released in 2004. The episodes are all split into two parts and are titled The Bad Beginning, The Reptile Room, The Wide Window and The Miserable Mill. In splitting the episodes into these equal parts Netflix has made it very easy to addictively binge watch the whole series in one go. This is perfect for a weekend Netflix binge. The theme tune of the TV series was originally scored by James Newton Howard, famous for the score of The Hunger Games and many others. It does get a bit repetitive and you may well want to skip it before you start singing along.

Neil Patrick Harris plays the villainous Count Olaf, who plots to gain the Baudelaire fortune throughout each episode.  In the process, he disguises himself, sometimes humorously as a scientific assistant, a Captain and a secretary. I thoroughly enjoyed Neil Patrick Harris as Count Olaf and certainly preferred him to Jim Carrey. If I have a favourite character in the series, it’s Count Olaf.

In the final episodes, Dr Orwell is introduced and is closely linked to George Orwell’s novel 1984 and Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. I enjoyed the allusions to these books and was haunted by the timing of the references to 1984 and the similarities in modern society. The other episodes have quirky references to literature as well as many unanswered questions about strands of the plot. This in turn gets quite frustrating as you passionately watch every episode, with the hope of finding answers. Much like the hope for the Baudelaire’s future, you soon realise that this is not a fairy tale with a happy ending or any of the answers you may want.

I thought that this series was absolutely worth a watch, especially as you can tell that the writers and the directors have tried to appeal to the fans of the original book series. I thought that the series length was just about perfect and that the plots of each episode weren’t too complicated to follow. There’s no gaps in the TV series, so those who haven’t read the books will still be able to follow as well.

Overall, this series on Netflix has the potential to be as popular as Stranger Things but might appeal to the fans of the original books more than anyone else. This was a very entertaining series and I would highly recommend that you invest in the characters, but keep in mind the inevitable sad and gloomy ending. Its overly negative storyline might be too disheartening for some and its miserable theme may open a window into a pessimistic outlook on life, like it did when I watched it.

Image: “A Series of Unfortunate Events” by Claudia Gabriela Marques Vieira is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Netflix Originals Reviews: How to solve a problem like Luke Cage

By Warren Tutt

 The super strong, steel skinned ‘hero for hire’ of Harlem. This is Netflix’s title character for their newest offering for their Marvel serial slate, Luke Cage. However, after more than a century of super humans and demigods triumphing over alien attacks and evil scientists, do we really need another thirteen hours of it? Yes, as it would turn out.

 By focusing on the limitations of his powers rather the concrete smashing, bulletproof nature of Luke Cage’s abilities, creator Cheo Hodari Coker finally captures a believable hero. Ditching Cage’s traditional yellow shirt and golden ‘tiara’ allow him to blend into a modern Harlem, balancing protecting the vulnerable from criminals whilst still having to pay rent. Reality constantly being re-established by Luke’s annoyance at having to buy new clothes every time someone thinks shooting him will have any impact on him.

 With great effect a whole ensemble of supporting characters are given the time and imagination to develop as individuals. A family of corrupt business owners and politicians lead the onslaught to keep Harlem under a tight grip whilst detective Misty Knights deals with the consequences of an exploited police force. Perhaps learning a lesson from predecessor Jessica Jones, female characters in the drama are given more screen time than any Marvel product before. If there’s one think bullet-proof skin can’t protect you from, its the colliding of strong, un-alterable female characters who will do anything for what they believe in.

 After the success of Daredevil and Jessica Jones, Luke Cage is another step before the next instalment Iron Fist, released early this year, sets the franchise up for The Defenders. Hoping to match the popularity of The Avengers, Netflix and Marvel will combine all the heroes of New York to form another super hero team up. Here’s hoping Cage keeps his individual flavour and style and isn’t wrestled into comic book spandex!

Image: “Luke Cage” by Miguel Angel Aranda is licensed under the Public Domain.