Flatmate Diet Interviews -How Has Arriving at University Affected You? Part Four

By Jodie Bailey

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

Competent.

  1. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

It’s got worse, the cooking equipment here is really bad.

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

No.

  1. How much do you spend on food each week roughly?

£25

  1. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)?

£0

  1. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without?

Spaghetti, gouda cheese or edam

  1. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?

Not enough, 2-3

  1. What is a typical breakfast for you?

Cornflakes and coffee.

  1. What do you normally have for lunch?

Cheese toastie and apple.

  1. What do you typically have for dinner?

Pasta pesto, try to squeeze some veg in there.

  1. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?

40 units, £40

  1. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university?

Get catered, save so much time! Eat oranges – great for vitamin C.

 

 

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

Good, I like cooking,

  1. How would you say you’re cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

I have more free time to cook, so I enjoy it more now

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

I avoid dairy for moral reasons, sort of pescatarian – I eat a lot of veg instead of substitutes to cut costs

  1. How much do you spend on food each week roughly?

£15

  1. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)?

Never

  1. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without? Mayonnaise, garlic, honey
  2. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?

3-4 a day

  1. What is a typical breakfast for you?

Scrambled eggs on toast

  1. What do you normally have for lunch?

Leftovers

  1. What do you typically have for dinner?

Fried/ grilled veg with either a wrap/sweet potatoes/rice

  1. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?

£5-10, cocktail weeks cost a bit more (up to £20)

  1. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university? Better to make food in bulk, so you don’t have to buy ready meals, it’s all home-cooked

 

 

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

Average for an undergraduate, but not good, definitely not good

  1. How would you say you’re cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

The skill itself has not changed, but I’ve gained a lot of experience by cooking each day – particularly the skills of thinking ahead and buying what is needed

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

No

  1. How much do you spend on food each week roughly?

£20

  1. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)?

£20

  1. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without?

Crumpets and tea

  1. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?

2-3

  1. What is a typical breakfast for you?

Cereal, or crumpet with egg, or scones

  1. What do you normally have for lunch?

Same as breakfast, noodles, pasta or leftovers

  1. What do you typically have for dinner?

Rice or potato with other vegetables and some other meats

  1. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?

2 pints of beer, £10 max.

  1. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university?

Buy what you need and calculate the amount you will need so you don’t over buy. Also as an international student, I would say buy ingredients that you’d have at home because you may not be able to make British food.

 

Image: Self-supplied.

Flatmate Diet Interviews -How Has Arriving at University Affected You? Part Three

By Jodie Bailey

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

Adequate

  1. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

I cook easier and quicker things

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

Continue reading Flatmate Diet Interviews -How Has Arriving at University Affected You? Part Three

Against All Odds ‘Tipped’ for Success

By Tony Allen 

A mere four songs into new Norwich rock outfit Against All Odds’ slot, supporting The High Points at Bedfords Crypt, singer Georgi Ball stops. She looks out onto the packed room, thanking everyone for coming and pointing out that the appearance is in aid of the band’s first EP release.

Continue reading Against All Odds ‘Tipped’ for Success

Art forms, Storytelling and Video Games

By Ewa Giera 

As we all know, storytelling has been around for a pretty long time. Over the years, it’s moved on from oral tradition, early forms of written, phonetic English, Shakespeare, over to the modern novel and short stories, and as some seem to believe, ending at film. However, the public is largely split over whether film is the endgame for artistic storytelling or whether there’s something more waiting for us to get noticed.

Continue reading Art forms, Storytelling and Video Games

It’s Easy Being Green

Last month saw the annual Go Green Week take place at UEA. Tony Allen looks back on the event and we hear from Students’ Union Environment Officer Veronica White to gauge her reaction to the week.

From 13th to 17th February, UEA’s Students’ Union took part in People and Planet’s tenth national Go Green Week. The idea is that various local groups take action and spread awareness around matters to do with conservation and protecting the environment.

The SU, working with University team Sustainable UEA, put on a busy programme of events to promote sustainability at UEA and attempt to gain suggestions on how to better protect the environment on campus and further afield.

On Monday, the main event was a Vegetarian and Vegan market, where hungry students could try food that is better for the planet and their bodies. The first day of events also saw a quiz run by the Environmental Sciences Society and the first in a series of relaxing biodiversity walks around campus, led by UEA wardens.

SU Environment Officer Veronica White told The Broad: “I felt that the Vegan & Vegetarian Fair on Monday was my biggest accomplishment with regards to organisation. It was the event that stressed me the most and the one that I was most pleased to see was successful. I’m happy that students got to try various vegan and vegetarian foods and I hope it opened people’s eyes to the possibilities these diets offer.”

On Tuesday, before an evening screening of Avatar, Go Green Week took over the Hive for a second day in a row, this time for a green consultation where students and staff members could learn about what is already being done and have their say, giving the SU their views and ideas about conservation and reducing environmental impact on campus.

Veronica said: “we got some great suggestions from students with regards to making the university and Union more sustainable.

“These suggestions we’re collating into themes which we can use to lobby the university to make changes – from introducing more water fountains on campus to making better use of our beautiful environment in our learning and teaching services.”

Wednesday saw a tour of sustainable labs at UEA, before on Thursday, students who missed out earlier in the week were treated to another wave of guided nature walks around the lake, and there was a zero-waste workshop in the Hive- part of the Union’s self-professed ‘Green Action Day’.

The week was rounded off on Friday by a trip to Swaffham, and up to the panoramic viewing platform of the area’s imposing wind turbine. This gave participants the opportunity to take in the views while also learning about renewable energy in the UK.

Veronica named this as her favourite event of the week, continuing: “The event which I had the most fun at was the Panoramic Wind Turbine Tour at the Green Britain Centre. I had initially suggested we organise an event there as a bit of a joke, so it felt surreal to be climbing up the turbine with a large group of students whose interests align with mine.”

Veronica spoke of her hopes that the event would continue as a fixture at UEA in future years, adding: “I hope that it is even more successful with each coming year. I believe this year was significant because I feel like Amy [Rust, Campaigns and Democracy Officer] and I really created a relationship with Sustainable UEA and members of staff on the University side of things. I hope this relationship continues to strengthen and we as a Union can work effectively with the university to create engaging events which reach a large number of students.”

She reflected on the week as a whole, saying: “People who know me well will know that I’m glad the week is over. It was a lot of work to organise and some of the logistics got confusing in the days leading up to various events, however overall I believe it was a successful week.”

Judging by the widespread positive reactions to the latest Go Green Week, it looks set to remain a mainstay of the UEA calendar.

Image courtesy of UEA SU

Taking Back Sunday Concert Review

By Jessica Foulger

Taking Back Sunday continue to impress the world with their music, and Norwich is no exception, as they conquer the UEA’s LCR.

Despite the show not selling out, Taking Back Sunday perform with the same youthful angst and zest that made them so infectious and lovable back in the early 2000s. It is safe to say I have revisited my teenage, ‘I hate the world’ self, whilst finding my older, more reflective self, deeply appreciating Taking Back Sunday’s recent, more mature artistry.

The five-piece from Long Island, New York are touring the UK and Europe in support of the 2016 release ‘Tidal Wave’ which sees them continue a more Rock/Pop sound with occasional heavy hooks whilst retaining melodic guitar riffs. It is a more mature, refined sound, with honest lyrics. The set opens with the fiery opening track ‘Deathwolf’, off their latest release. A perfect opening track with punchy guitar riffs that excite an eager audience, as lead singer Adam Lazarra screams the lyric ‘had a little bit and we want some more.’ Yes, Adam, we certainly want some more! It is clear TBS have so much more to offer in the world of rock music, with Adam’s lyrics as painfully honest in nature as they once were at the commercial peak of their career a decade ago but also possessing a contemplative and nostalgic quality. This is a band that aren’t ready to hang up the mic just yet.

Their set is a balanced mix of old and new and a couple songs in, the band get the crowd moshing and headbanging with ‘A decade under the Influence’ with the crowd screaming ‘anyone will do tonight’ right back at Lazarra and co. The nostalgia of the older tracks electrifies the LCR as fans revel in the pop-punk stage in Taking Back Sunday’s career. The band return to the new tunes with ‘All Excess’, a bouncy track with a damn catchy chorus, as of course the main purpose of this tour is to promote 2016’s ‘Tidal Wave.’

Lazarra takes a breather mid-set to explain the story behind the ‘Call Came Running’ music video. An anecdote about how his father came to the house to find blood all over Lazarra’s hands, bowing his head saying “Adam what have you done now.’ Lazarra concedes that the joke was funnier the last time he told it, but to be honest, I think the audience just wanted more belters to mosh and dance to. It is an awesome video, though, check it out!

I am thrilled that the band performed my personal favourite track off their 2014 release ‘Happiness Is’ entitled ‘Better Homes and Better Gardens.’ Lazarra becomes reflective about the meaning of the song admitting that it is emotional and hard-going to perform live. It is about his divorce during the writing of the record which becomes more real and hard-hitting, with the opening line of the track, ‘when you took that ring off.’ Despite the deeply personal and emotional nature of the song, it shows how mature Lazarra’s song-writing has become. This isn’t the same teenage pop-punk band that sung merely about girls, sex and friendship, but a wiser and older band that have experienced life and the turbulence of adulthood and fatherhood. The lyrics are beautiful; the guitars are raw.

As the set draws to a close, the band perform possibly the two most recognised and nostalgic Taking Band Sunday songs. Of course, the crowd pleasers are essential, but one tipsy bloke bellows throughout the whole set ‘MIAMI…MIAMI’, to a point where I feel like saying, mate, I’ve googled the setlist and there’s no Miami, I’m sorry. Anyway, when the opening riff to ‘Cute without the E’ kicks in, I can’t help but delve into the mosh pit. This song brings back so many memories for me and the nostalgia I feel is overwhelming as I and hundreds of others scream ‘And will you tell all your friends you’ve got your gun to my head.’ The set closes with ‘Makedamnsure’, the quintessential emo pop-punk hit as Lazarra yelps the sassy ‘I just wanna bring you down so badly’, executing his trademark microphone twist to perfection.

Well, boys, you’ve certainly brought down the LCR.

Image: “Adam Lazzara” by Dan is licensed under the CC BY-ND 2.0.

Is UEA’s ‘green’ status over?

by Rob Klim

The UEA campus has always been famous for its green space, environmental innovation and especially, the rabbits residing across the grounds. However, as the university’s green credentials begin to emerge as more troubling than they would appear to be, it may be that UEA are not doing enough to protect this status well enough.

We have all been prospective students here once – we were all assured of the environmental conservation policies and the amounts of money and effort put into projects such as the Biomass Centre and TEC buildings. This reassurance, however, falls short as Lewis Martin of People and Planet points out, UEA are “certainly not” keeping their word.

Martin, an activist within People and Planet – an organisation emphasising the importance of environmental sustainability and conservation – highlights the hypocrisy of the university:

“How can it claim that all the time it has £250,000 invested in fossil fuel companies, which have increasingly smaller returns, and has no money invested into greener renewable energies?”

It has also been revealed that when People and Planet sought to press the university to invest in renewable energies, the university has refused to budge. Helen Redeirmann, another activist, has emphasised further how far the university goes to avoid discussing the issue. Around six months have passed since UEA had begun to consider opening up a dialogue, and since then the investment in fossil fuels has doubled.

Martin also explains how other universities are reading much further ahead in an en masse divestment from fossil fuels companies, stating that “other universities are dropping their investments and they don’t even claim to be the “number one green university in the country”.

People and Planet’s University League – a league table ranking universities by environmental and ethical performance – has places UEA in the 48th place in the country, with a total score of 45.6%, and whilst the environmental policy is ranked at a 100%, ethical divestment and carbon reduction remain at 0%.

UEA’s investment in fossil fuels comes to nearly £300,000. All this money, could perhaps be better spent on research to help, not hinder, the environment.

To get involved, join a group of people every Wednesday in either the bar or one of the bookable rooms upstairs in Union House.

 

image courtesy of freestocks, at https://unsplash.com/@freestocks

 

Flatmate Diet Interviews -How Has Arriving at University Affected You? Part Two

By Jodie Bailey

1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?
I never really cooked much, but when I did it was like ‘HOLY F***’ – imagine Gordan Ramsay and Jamie Oliver had a kid together, it was incredible.
2. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all? Basically I eat canned food and I don’t cook from scratch. Due to a lack of money I can’t afford fresh ingredients, also cooking is time intensive and you have to share kitchen space and wash up.
3. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?                                                                                                N/A but I don’t like vegetables
4. How much do you spend on food each week roughly? £37
5. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)? £10-12
6. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without? Sausages and baked beans
7. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day? 0.1
8. What is a typical breakfast for you?                                                                                              Skip breakfast
9. What do you normally have for lunch?                                                                                      Cereal and then a can of soup or sausages/baked beans
10. What do you typically have for dinner?                                                                                  Super noodles or tuna straight out of a can, I eat a lot of burgers from the SU shop
11. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?                                                                                                                                                      60 units, I don’t always remember, £20-30
12. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university? Buy paper plates plastic cups, plastic cutlery to save on washing up

1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?                       I had very little experience of cooking so they were very minimal
2. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all? I have learnt how to cook independently for the first time, I eat more fresh fruit and veg as I find it’s cheaper to make my own sauces (which are healthier) for pasta dishes. I also eat less meat as it’s too expensive to eat each day.
3. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?                                                                                                  N/A, but I am teetotal
4. How much do you spend on food each week roughly? £14
5. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)? £5-15
6. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without? Pasatta, chopped tomatoes, an onion, tomato/garlic/chilli puree, dried mixed herbs– with these they are the basis of a pasta or chilli sauce – add whatever veg you have or meat and you’re away.
7. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?                                                Probably all five
8. What is a typical breakfast for you?                                                                                                    2 crumpets, sometimes cheesy scrambled egg done in the microwave alongside it or with toast
9. What do you normally have for lunch?                                                                                              If I’m out I will have made a lunchbox up in advance with a sandwich or crisps, some fruit and a cereal bar. Or if I’m at home I’ll make cheese on toast or pizza toast.
10. What do you typically have for dinner?                                                                                   Pasta with a homemade sauce or jacket potatoes with the classic combination of cheese and beans, what else could you need?
11. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?                                                                                                                                                    I’m teetotal so I don’t drink any alcohol. If I go out I’ll order a J2O or mocktails/softails, at home I really like a glass of Shloer.
12. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university? Having frozen vegetables and tinned foods are great for emergencies when there’s nothing fresh to eat, but sometimes it is worth buying a nice loaf of bread or fresh veg if it’s something you really like and appreciate, plus fresh veg isn’t really that expensive. Also definitely invest in a student cookbook, you don’t have to stick to the recipes, be inventive and innovate.

Image: Self-supplied