Category Archives: Food

Flatmate Diet Interviews -How Has Arriving at University Affected You? Part Four

By Jodie Bailey

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

Competent.

  1. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

It’s got worse, the cooking equipment here is really bad.

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

No.

  1. How much do you spend on food each week roughly?

£25

  1. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)?

£0

  1. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without?

Spaghetti, gouda cheese or edam

  1. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?

Not enough, 2-3

  1. What is a typical breakfast for you?

Cornflakes and coffee.

  1. What do you normally have for lunch?

Cheese toastie and apple.

  1. What do you typically have for dinner?

Pasta pesto, try to squeeze some veg in there.

  1. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?

40 units, £40

  1. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university?

Get catered, save so much time! Eat oranges – great for vitamin C.

 

 

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

Good, I like cooking,

  1. How would you say you’re cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

I have more free time to cook, so I enjoy it more now

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

I avoid dairy for moral reasons, sort of pescatarian – I eat a lot of veg instead of substitutes to cut costs

  1. How much do you spend on food each week roughly?

£15

  1. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)?

Never

  1. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without? Mayonnaise, garlic, honey
  2. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?

3-4 a day

  1. What is a typical breakfast for you?

Scrambled eggs on toast

  1. What do you normally have for lunch?

Leftovers

  1. What do you typically have for dinner?

Fried/ grilled veg with either a wrap/sweet potatoes/rice

  1. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?

£5-10, cocktail weeks cost a bit more (up to £20)

  1. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university? Better to make food in bulk, so you don’t have to buy ready meals, it’s all home-cooked

 

 

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

Average for an undergraduate, but not good, definitely not good

  1. How would you say you’re cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

The skill itself has not changed, but I’ve gained a lot of experience by cooking each day – particularly the skills of thinking ahead and buying what is needed

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

No

  1. How much do you spend on food each week roughly?

£20

  1. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)?

£20

  1. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without?

Crumpets and tea

  1. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?

2-3

  1. What is a typical breakfast for you?

Cereal, or crumpet with egg, or scones

  1. What do you normally have for lunch?

Same as breakfast, noodles, pasta or leftovers

  1. What do you typically have for dinner?

Rice or potato with other vegetables and some other meats

  1. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?

2 pints of beer, £10 max.

  1. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university?

Buy what you need and calculate the amount you will need so you don’t over buy. Also as an international student, I would say buy ingredients that you’d have at home because you may not be able to make British food.

 

Image: Self-supplied.

Flatmate Diet Interviews -How Has Arriving at University Affected You? Part Three

By Jodie Bailey

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

Adequate

  1. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

I cook easier and quicker things

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

Continue reading Flatmate Diet Interviews -How Has Arriving at University Affected You? Part Three

Flatmate Diet Interviews -How Has Arriving at University Affected You? Part Two

By Jodie Bailey

1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?
I never really cooked much, but when I did it was like ‘HOLY F***’ – imagine Gordan Ramsay and Jamie Oliver had a kid together, it was incredible.
2. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all? Basically I eat canned food and I don’t cook from scratch. Due to a lack of money I can’t afford fresh ingredients, also cooking is time intensive and you have to share kitchen space and wash up.
3. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?                                                                                                N/A but I don’t like vegetables
4. How much do you spend on food each week roughly? £37
5. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)? £10-12
6. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without? Sausages and baked beans
7. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day? 0.1
8. What is a typical breakfast for you?                                                                                              Skip breakfast
9. What do you normally have for lunch?                                                                                      Cereal and then a can of soup or sausages/baked beans
10. What do you typically have for dinner?                                                                                  Super noodles or tuna straight out of a can, I eat a lot of burgers from the SU shop
11. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?                                                                                                                                                      60 units, I don’t always remember, £20-30
12. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university? Buy paper plates plastic cups, plastic cutlery to save on washing up

1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?                       I had very little experience of cooking so they were very minimal
2. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all? I have learnt how to cook independently for the first time, I eat more fresh fruit and veg as I find it’s cheaper to make my own sauces (which are healthier) for pasta dishes. I also eat less meat as it’s too expensive to eat each day.
3. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?                                                                                                  N/A, but I am teetotal
4. How much do you spend on food each week roughly? £14
5. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)? £5-15
6. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without? Pasatta, chopped tomatoes, an onion, tomato/garlic/chilli puree, dried mixed herbs– with these they are the basis of a pasta or chilli sauce – add whatever veg you have or meat and you’re away.
7. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?                                                Probably all five
8. What is a typical breakfast for you?                                                                                                    2 crumpets, sometimes cheesy scrambled egg done in the microwave alongside it or with toast
9. What do you normally have for lunch?                                                                                              If I’m out I will have made a lunchbox up in advance with a sandwich or crisps, some fruit and a cereal bar. Or if I’m at home I’ll make cheese on toast or pizza toast.
10. What do you typically have for dinner?                                                                                   Pasta with a homemade sauce or jacket potatoes with the classic combination of cheese and beans, what else could you need?
11. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?                                                                                                                                                    I’m teetotal so I don’t drink any alcohol. If I go out I’ll order a J2O or mocktails/softails, at home I really like a glass of Shloer.
12. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university? Having frozen vegetables and tinned foods are great for emergencies when there’s nothing fresh to eat, but sometimes it is worth buying a nice loaf of bread or fresh veg if it’s something you really like and appreciate, plus fresh veg isn’t really that expensive. Also definitely invest in a student cookbook, you don’t have to stick to the recipes, be inventive and innovate.

Image: Self-supplied

INTO Restaurant Review

By Mitchel Chan

An ever-present issue facing both UEA students and staff alike is deciding where to have lunch on campus. Whilst there may be some who are dedicated enough to bring food from home, the rest of us weak-willed souls must face tough decisions on where to fill our stomachs.

For those that do not know, INTO is a subsection of UEA that allows students to do their A-levels or foundation-level courses here on campus. It also contains a restaurant that serves hot food throughout the day, and everyone is welcome to eat there.

The INTO building is to the left of the UEA Medical Centre and the restaurant itself is located on the first floor of this impressively modern building. Upon first glance, the INTO restaurant evokes memories of a school canteen, with its heavy emphasis on self-service. However, rest assured that the food served here is much better than the dry fish fingers and soggy chips of days gone past.

There is a wide variety of food and drinks available, from cold sandwiches to a well-stocked salad bar. Without a doubt the main stars of the show, however are the lunch and dinner dishes that draw in large crowds. You are guaranteed to never be bored of the food, as the chefs rotate their menu every day. Each “menu of the day” follows the same format, with four main dishes consisting of three meat dishes and a vegetarian option. This is accompanied by the choice of four sides, which are rice, noodles, potatoes and vegetables. The cooking methods of these differ by the day, so you may be getting herb rice and roast potatoes on one day, to jungle friend rice and Lyonnaise potatoes on the next.

into-menu

One of the menus seen at INTO, with allergy advice.

Perhaps one of the main draws of having lunch or dinner at INTO is its attractive pricing. One main and two sides will set you back £4. If you fancy some juice and some dessert with your meal, you can add them to your meal for an additional £1. Furthermore, the restaurant provides Sriracha sauce and soy sauce. For those of you who haven’t tried these before, you should do so immediately. The Sriracha sauce, in particular is very popular with many customers, as it adds a tangy yet spicy kick to any meal.

On the day that I was there, I had the option to choose between Chicken with Mushroom and Tarragon Sauce, Steak and Kidney Pie, Roasted Pork Loin and Wok Fried Vegetables for my main course. I chose the first option, and had two portions of steamed rice as my side. The chicken was quite tender, and I was quite satisfied with the flavour of the sauce. It was rich and creamy, with the mushrooms adding a nice bite. There is not much to say about the rice, except that it was fluffy and filling.

As I was having lunch with my friend, I found his meal to be quite attractive, and as such asked if I could use it for the purpose of my article. He chose the same chicken as me, with the potatoes and rice. He also tried the broccoli and blue cheese soup, and took some extra broccoli from the salad bar. He found the soup to be quite “tasty”, and felt that the chicken was “delicious.”

The overall experience of having a meal at INTO is very pleasant. The vibe is very relaxed, and one can even watch live news broadcast on the multiple TVs available. The seating area is plentiful, and there is never a problem finding a table even during peak mealtimes.

Following our meal, we placed our trays on a trolley, before bidding farewell to this homely restaurant. I will definitely return to this place, and I hope that you too will try the delicious food at INTO.

Image: INTO Centre

Flatmate Diet Interviews -How Has Arriving at University Affected You? Part One

By Jodie Bailey

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

Pretty good, I follow recipes pretty well and I grew up watching a lot of cooking shows. Also I worked in the food industry for 3 years since I was 17 years old.

  1. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

I cook dishes more often as my parents used to cook a lot and I cook bigger portions so I can reheat leftovers. I eat more convenient and easy foods, and a lot of cheaper foods as well as food is more expensive here.

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

I am Muslim so I only eat Halal foods, and I’m partially vegetarian as Halal foods are more expensive here than back home in Canada.

  1. How much do you spend on food each week roughly?

£17

  1. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)?

£15

  1. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without?

Tea, bread with butter and jam, bananas

  1. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?

5

  1. What is a typical breakfast for you?

Scrambled eggs and toast or fried egg, or yoghurt with fruit

  1. What do you normally have for lunch?

I don’t usually eat lunch, I tend to have a few little snacks throughout the day

  1. What do you typically have for dinner?

A rice dish like curry or a pasta

  1. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol?

Hardly drink at all, so £0

  1. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university?

Budgeting is really important, try to make a lot of food at one time so you can eat it throughout the week, and try to limit your intake of alcohol as it will be cheaper and healthier for you. Also, try to make brand swaps to save money. Get stuff high in nutrition but low on cost e.g. eggs and bananas. Buying produce is cheaper than take out.

 

  1. Before arriving at UEA how would you have described your cooking skills?

I didn’t cook, I didn’t think I had any cooking skills

  1. How would you say your cooking has changed since arriving at UEA, if it has at all?

Well I’m pleasantly surprised by the stuff I come up with, if you don’t cook you don’t eat and I get hungry a lot

  1. Do you have any special dietary requirements, if yes, then how does this affect your cooking style and the food you eat?

Nope

  1. How much do you spend on food each week roughly?

£30-40

  1. How much do you spend on food out (including takeaways)?

No more than a tenner a week

  1. What are your cupboard staples/ the one food that you could not live without?

Sweet potato

  1. How many fruit and veg would you say you eat each day?

3 portions of fruit, 3 portions of veg

  1. What is a typical breakfast for you?

Peanut butter porridge or yogurt with granola

  1. What do you normally have for lunch?

Sweet potato, tuna and sweetcorn

  1. What do you typically have for dinner?

Chicken and mixed veg

  1. How much alcohol do you drink each week and how much would you say you spend on alcohol? I don’t know …A lot …a lot, about £30
  2. Care to share any advice for future students regarding cooking or food at university?

Relax, it’s not as hard as you think it’s going to be.

 

Image: A student cupboard from one of the University flats. Independently sourced.

Grosvenor Fish Bar Review

By Cassie Waters

In my last article I wrote about how my friends are cocktail snobs. I happen to be a chip snob. Sadly, there are very few benefits of being a chip snob, it’s not glamorous, you can’t precociously discuss it with people and it won’t bring you much kudos. But it does mean I can spot a good chip when I try one. I have eaten my way around the fish and chip shops of Norwich and I can safely say that Grosvenor’s does an excellent chip.

 Grosvenor’s has been around for a long time but it’s only more recently that it’s become the unique chip shop it is now. It describes itself as a “fish and chip grotto”, which puts me in mind of winter and elves. I would instead describe the low ceilings, the tunnelling walkways and corrugated iron walls of the underground seating area as being like a cave or secret bunker, a place to hide and stuff yourself with chips and batter until it’s safe to come out.  Upstairs where you are served the atmosphere is busy and cheerful and the staff make sure you’re never waiting too long, no matter how many customers there are crammed into that small space. If you fancy having a drink with your fish and chips you can take them across the road to The Birdcage and sit in there.

I am usually suspicious of fish and chip shops that look too nice as my dad always says that it means they don’t try as hard with the food, but this is absolutely not the case with Grosvenor’s, the food is equally as good as the decor. The queue spilling out onto the street is a permanent fixture! The chips aren’t soggy or overly greasy, nor are they too dry. Their fish is delicious – not a bone in sight! And the batter is perfectly crispy, I could eat it on its own (and I do, thanks to a friend who just prefers the fish!). They don’t just do traditional fish and chips, their menu extends to wraps such and “Bass with Sass”, a sea bass fillet wrap with lettuce and spicy mango salsa, a favourite amongst my friends and the cholesterol busting “B.B.L.T”, a treacle and beer cured crispy battered bacon in a roll.

So that’s how Grosvenor’s has worked its way into one of our favourite places to eat and up near the top of my expertly compiled best chips list. Go and treat yourself.

Image From Grosvenor Fish Bar’s Twitter Page

Gonzo’s – Burgers and Cocktails

By Cassie Waters

Anyone who knows my flat from first year knows how much we loved Gonzo’s Tea Room. Being a flat who frequently turned our noses up at the idea of a club night (unless it was our beloved Damn Good LCR), we had some truly brilliant bar crawls and our favourite place to end up was always Gonzo’s. We now know all the bar staff by name. But Gonzo’s isn’t just the place to go for drinks, during the day it turns from a trippy hipster bar, complete with a disco ball and subtitled films projected on the walls (the only time I have ever got round to watching Pulp Fiction was sprawled across the bed style seats, cocktail in hand), into an eccentric and eclectic tea room that serves possibly the best chicken burgers and wings in Norwich.

A huge draw of Gonzo’s is its amazing interior. Don’t be fooled by the tiny bleak entrance, once you walk down that hall and enter the main bar/tearoom you are met with an artfully decorated hoarder’s paradise. Any knickknack or curiosity you could imagine can be found in that small space; from board games to Chucky figurines to a modern image of the last supper to a picture of Heisenberg in military uniform. The decor of Gonzo’s has the same fascinating effect whether you go night or day, there’s always something new to look at and talk about.

The main reason why we would go was that as well as being occasional club snobs, my flatmates were cocktail snobs. Two of them knew how to make cocktails, having previously worked in bars and we all begrudged paying such a lot of money for a drink that wasn’t that good. As many bars as we have tried we have not yet been able to find a match for Gonzo’s cocktails. They truly are the best. They do everything from classics like the Negroni to their own creations like my personal favourite, the Queen and Country which comes served in a mug. If you’re a coffee drinker, I’m told they do a really fantastic Espresso Martini. Make no mistake, Gonzo’s cocktails aren’t cheap, usually costing between £8 and £9, but if you want a well made cocktail that’s different to the bog standard ones you can get almost anywhere else then this is your place.

After we’d been a few times at night, we expanded into trying the food in the day, adding a new dimension to our favourite place. If you’re on a health kick, Gonzo’s is probably not the best place but for burgers, chips and chicken wings you just can’t beat it. All interestingly named (the “Dead Elvis” anyone?), the burgers come in a wide variety that’s bound to appeal to everyone. My favourite is quite tame, “The Camilla” is a house fried chicken burger with Cajun chips but you could be a bit more adventurous and go for the “3 Little Pigs”, a pulled pork burger with pork scratching, cola soaked bacon and apple sauce. If you go between 3 and 6pm you can get chicken wings for 25p each and there are over 20 flavours to choose. The bacon and maple syrup wings are to die for!

But be warned, Gonzo’s can have an addictive effect. My flat and I realised we had a problem when we were in there 4 days in a row. And if I haven’t been able to persuade you to try it out then perhaps their tag line can: “Saving Norwich from Prince of Wales Road since 2008”.

Image:

Five Steps to Enjoying Your Food at University

By Alex Stapleton

You have a fantastic amount of freedom at university, perhaps for the first time in your life. This also means that you have to feed yourself as well! I realised how much I enjoyed cooking when I was in my flat at UEA, and while you will undoubtedly miss home cooking, there are plenty of ways to still enjoy your food while you are studying in Norwich.

 

  1. Learn to cook

Possibly the most important thing on this list, being able to cook is a very important skill that you’ll need. Not only can it be cheaper to cook your own food than buy ready meals all of the time, it is far healthier and is another activity that you can do to get out of your room and socialise with your new flatmates. There are also cooking classes available through the Student’s Union throughout the year, often labelled as “Give It A Go” sessions, so make sure you are in the loop when it comes to these things.

 

Of course, cooking isn’t for everyone. You can make meals as complex or as simple as you like and can even enlist the help of friends! Ready meals are also becoming healthier, so it is not always a bad choice to have one of these after a long day of lectures if you don’t feel like cooking.

 

  1. Know your kitchen

In the campus flats, one of the first things you may notice is that there are no ovens. In fact, the microwaves double up as ovens, which took my flat about a week to actually realise and figure out how to work! Familiarise yourself with the appliances in your kitchen, as well as the utensils that you are going to bring with you. It can be very irritating when you have decided to make a certain meal and realise you haven’t got the right equipment! Sharing kitchen utensils is a great way to minimise this chance, so long as you all wash up after yourselves!

 

  1. Eat out

Food that you know you have put lots of effort into can be very enjoyable, but there is nothing like eating at a restaurant or getting a takeaway every now and again. It gives you a break from cooking for a night and also a chance to bond with your friends and flatmates (if you choose to eat with them!). There are so many restaurants in Norwich, especially at Riverside, so you will always be spoilt for choice! Going with other people is obviously a lot cheaper and more enjoyable, just don’t forget your NUS discount card!

 

There are also plenty of places on campus to eat. The Campus Kitchen, Zest and Ziggy’s all offer food at a reasonable price, and the bars also have a selection of pizzas and fast food cooked on site to enjoy.

 

  1. Get a cookbook

Getting a cookbook is a brilliant idea for many reasons. It gives you a whole range of dishes to cook and enjoy, and encourages variety in your diet. Making something new is always exciting, and I always add a little note in my cookbooks about how the food turned out. Most cookbooks now offer healthy and vegetarian alternatives, and there are so many out there to choose from. I recommend the “Nosh” student cookbook series. These are filled with easy recipes that can be cooked in student accommodation, and give you an indication of how easy they are, as well as how much they cost, so you can stay on top of your finances. It also gives examples of food planners, where you can plan out your meals for a week, identify the ingredients you need, and find out how much it is all going to cost. Shopping around for ingredients is also encouraged, as you can get a good quality week of meals for between £15-£20 if you shop right!

 

  1. Try to eat healthily

It can be so tempting to just go off the rails at uni, since you have no one to tell you to eat your vegetables or have your five-a-day. It’s all down to you, so creating food which is not only tasty but nutritious is very important. Make sure you are buying and using fruit and vegetables (many of which are available frozen so they don’t go out of date in a week) every day, and a variety of these is also important. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and I know it can be very difficult to stomach it when you wake up at 2pm with a hangover after a night at the LCR (we’ve all done it at UEA and the new Freshers will do soon too!), but having even a piece of fruit within 10 minutes of waking up prepares you for an exciting day at university. Ideally, a perfect breakfast is a bowl of cereal, a glass of water and a piece of fruit, so try your best to start your day right.

 

Cooking can often be seen as a chore, but there are many ways to make it fun and interesting when you have your kitchen and all the freedom you like.

Image from: www.unsplash.com

Recipe – Mug Pies

By Alex Stapleton

Need to impress someone or just fancy cooking something like mum would make at home? Mug pies are a delicious meal that can be cooked with the appliances in UEA’s accommodation (and also in an actual oven!). I made this chicken pie a week ago and it was a very tasty mid-week treat! If you do your shopping right, you can find all of the ingredients for no more than £6 (a little on the expensive side when on a student budget but a hearty meal!) and this recipe will easily feed you and another hungry friend (or if you have a big appetite like me, then you can have the whole thing to yourself)!

COST: 4/5 (Quite expensive)

PREPARATION TIME: 20-25 minutes

COOKING TIME: 25-30 minutes in total

WASHING UP: 3/5 (A fair amount)

Ingredients

– 1 tablespoon of butter

– 1 tablespoon of plain flour

– 250ml of milk

– 1/4 of a small leek (make sure to finely slice this, so you have only small pieces)

– 2 cooked chicken thighs (cut these into bitesize pieces)

(If you are making a vegetarian version, substitute these for a mixture of vegetables of your choice)

– 4 pinches of sage

– Puff pastry (enough to cover the top of your mugs)

– 1/2 of a small egg

– Salt and pepper

Equipment

– Tablespoon

– Microwave proof jug (if it is not microwaveable, it will melt, and plastic in a pie is not tasty)

– Knife (and kitchen scissors if using chicken)

– Chopping board

– Microwave/ovenproof mugs

– Extra mug for the egg

– Rolling pin

Method

  1. Place the butter in a microwaveable jug and microwave on high for 20-30 seconds until melted. Remove from the microwave (careful – hot!) and whisk in the flour until you have a roux (it should turn from a liquid into something that resembles dough).
  2. Slowly whisk in the milk (not too much at once), then microwave on high for 1 ½ minutes. Remove from the microwave (still hot!), stir in the small pieces of leek and microwave for a further 1 ½ minutes until thickened. This is your sauce.
  3. Stir the chicken and sage into the sauce. Give it a taste test and add seasoning to your liking. Transfer your mixture to the mugs.
  4. Preheat the oven to 200˚C (180˚C if you are lucky enough to have a fan oven)/400F/Gas mark 6. Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured surface (be sure to wipe the surface before and after using – you don’t know what has been on those kitchen tables in the UEA flats!) and cut out two circles to act as lids for your pies. You want to make the lids about 2cm larger than the rims of your mugs.
  5. Brush the rims of the mugs with the egg wash, then drape the pastry lids over the mugs and seal well against the outside of the mugs. Brush the tops with more egg wash. Make a small hole in the centre of the lid.
  6. Bake for 18-22 minutes until golden brown and puffed before serving. Don’t worry if the lid collapses into your pie – mine did the same. It is still very tasty.

 

Image: Self-supplied.

Recipe – Quesadillas

By Alex Stapleton

This dish is quick to prepare and easy to make. It is also one of the tastiest meals that I have cooked this semester! It is also really easy to turn this into a vegetarian meal – just replace the chicken for vegetables of your choice. This recipe serves one.

COST: 2/5 (Quite cheap)

PREPARATION TIME: 15-20 minutes

COOKING TIME: 10 minutes in total

WASHING UP: 3/5 (A fair amount)

Ingredients

– 1 chicken breast (or mixed vegetables. You could also use minced meat)

– Oil to fry (about 2 tablespoons)

– 1/2 onion (finely chopped)

– 1/2 pepper (finely chopped)

– 1 chili (if you want some spice. Finely chop this too)

– 3 mushrooms (sliced)

– 1 tablespoon of tomato puree, mixed with 4 tablespoons of water

– Salt and pepper

– 2 or 4 (depending on how hungry you are) soft flour tortilla wraps (try and get the larger ones)

– A small amount of butter

Equipment

– Chopping board

– Knife

– Kitchen scissors (optional)

– Frying pan

– Hob

– Grill (or oven)

– Mug

– Tablespoon

– Plate

Method

  1. Cut the chicken breast into small strips and fry it all until cooked through.
  2. Take the chicken out of the pan and leave it on the plate. Fry the onion in the pan until it begins to brown, then add the other vegetables. (If you are using mince instead of chicken, add this too and cook. Take off the heat after 4 minutes of cooking (and after the mince is no longer pink).
  3. In the mug, use the tablespoon to measure out and mix the tomato puree and water. Turn the grill on at the same time.
  4. Add the chicken to the vegetable mix and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Put the contents of the pan onto the plate and wash the frying pan.
  6. Butter one side of one wrap. Put this wrap butter side down in the pan and put it on the heat. Add some of the filling and put another buttered wrap (this time butter side up) on top of the filling.
  7. Place the pan and its contents under the grill until the butter begins to brown.
  8. Slide the browned quesadilla onto the plate, cut into wedges and enjoy. Repeat steps 6 and 7 if you have more wraps/filling to use.

Recipe: Joy May, Nosh for Students: A Fun Student Cookbook

Image: Self-supplied.

Recipe – Chicken Fried Rice

By Alex Stapleton

Fancy a Chinese takeaway but can’t put your bank account through the pain of spending takeaway prices? This chicken fried rice dish is not only much cheaper, but also much more fun to make than it is to phone someone and have to talk to them (yuck!). You’ll also feel proud of yourself that you can make something that tastes just as good!

This recipe can be turned into a vegetarian one simply by removing the chicken from the dish.

COST: 2/5 (Reasonably cheap)

PREPARATION TIME: 5-10 minutes

COOKING TIME: 15-20 minutes in total

WASHING UP: 2/5 (Some)

Ingredients

– 1/2 tablespoon of sesame oil

– 3 tablespoons of soy sauce

– One chicken breast, cut into bitesize pieces (make sure you cook this first)

– 1 diced carrot

– 1/2 diced celery stick

– 1/2 diced red pepper

– A handful of fresh peas (defrost these first if need be)

– 1/2 tin of sweetcorn

– 1 bag of microwaveable long grain rice (these are precooked and so can easily be fried)

– 2 large eggs

Equipment

– Tablespoon

– Chopping board and knife

– Kitchen scissors (optional)

– Wok

– Saucepan

– Fork (for beating the eggs)

– Mug (for beating the eggs)

Method

  1. Boil water in your saucepan and add the diced carrots. Let these boil for 5 minutes or until soft, then drain. Cook your chicken now if you have not already.

 

  1. Heat the sesame oil in the wok over a medium heat.

 

  1. Add the cooked chicken and 2 tablespoons of the soy sauce. Let this fry for 5-6 minutes, stirring regularly.

 

  1. Stir in the vegetables. Let this mix fry for another 5 minutes.

 

  1. Add the rice and stir thoroughly. At this point, you can turn the hob up to a high heat.

 

  1. Beat the eggs and pour them into the wok. Stir continuously until the eggs begin to set (you’ll know when they do because the mixture will start to stick to the wok). Add in the final tablespoon of soy sauce.

 

  1. Give the mixture one last stir on the heat and then serve immediately.