All posts by TheBroadEntertainment

A Rough Guide to UEA Slang

By Natalie Froome

So, the results are in and you’ll be joining UEA in September. You’re in for an amazing time, and to help out we’ve compiled a handy guide to some terms and slang names that are unique to UEA.

Square – The square is the centre of campus life and not actually a square. It’s that concrete courtyard with all the steps down that you probably saw on the open day. It’s a handy place to meet and also the perfect location for the student pastime that is summer day-drinking. Oh, and on Derby Day and Pimp my Barrow Livewire bring their speakers out and it is basically the scene of a massive outdoor party.

Derby Day – If you don’t like sport, you’ll probably pretend to be interested on Derby Day. Because it’s not really about sport. It’s about beating Essex.

The 5L’s – The official name for an unofficial UEA challenge. The 5 L’s have existed in the lore of UEA for…I don’t even know how long. The L’s are the Lake, Launderette, Library, LCR and Lecture theatre. Completing the challenge means having sex in all five locations. Side note: anyone who claims to have completed the 5 L’s is probably lying (lecture theatre? Really?).

The Hub – There’s different Hub’s for different schools, so make sure you know where yours is. The Hub is where you submit work to, where you get marked work back from, and where you pick up extension forms. They sort out all the academic stuff, you can just go in and ask about things you’re unsure about and they’ll try and help you.

The LCR – Apparently LCR stands for Lower Common Room. It’s not a common room, but rather the on-campus club. According to one Broad Editor it’s ‘Loud and messy, but also kinda like your primary school disco.’ It’s regarded fondly by UEA students and it’s probably somewhere you’ll become familiar with on Fresher’s week. The LCR also holds gigs and has hosted some pretty big names over the years.

The Hive – The Hive is the downstairs part of Union House, the area with the big pink benches and Unio coffee shop. It sometimes hosts student enterprise markets and is also used for fresher’s fair.

Union House – The big ol’ concrete block in the middle of campus. It contains the SU offices, the Hive, Scholars bar, Livewire, Unio, the LCR and has Red and Blue bar at the bottom. There’s also ‘bookable rooms’ upstairs in Union House that are used to host society meetings and sometimes seminars.

Cloud Dog – A UEA icon. Cloud Dog was a massive floofy white dog. She became a phenomenon in 2016 when students spotted her majestic presence on campus. Sighting cloud dog was something to write to the group chat about – and getting to pet her was worthy of major bragging rights. Cloud Dog has a Facebook page and The SU even made a statue of her in The Hive last semester as a reward for voting in the elections. Sadly, after suffering with arthritis, Cloud Dog left us last year for the great dog basket in the sky. However, her previous owners have now got a cloud puppy – which we hope will be following in cloud dogs paw-steps!

Red/Blue bar – UEA has two interconnecting bars (there’s also scholar’s bar – which is lovely, but for postgrads and mature students). Some people are strongly loyal to one side or the other, but for most it’s a case of where the space is and what you feel like doing. Blue bar hosts sports night and live music performances, whereas red bar has pool tables and is slightly bigger.

The Gender Neutrals – When UEA refurbed Union House back in 2015 they decided to make the toilets gender neutral to be more inclusive. These toilets also have free sanitary products courtesy of a campaign last year. ‘Going to the gender neutrals’ or ‘I’ll see you by the gender neutrals’ then became a thing.

The Broad – That massive lake on campus. And the name of UEA’s excellent online student magazine (not that we’re biased.) It’s Great for BBQ’s in the summer, not so great for falling into (from personal experience – it’s very cold). It’s also great for taking a walk around on a Saturday morning. Loads of people walk their dogs around it and you sometimes get to pet them. (again, personal experience, my record is 13 dogs).

Unio – The coffee shop in Union House. Getting to Unio when the queue isn’t massive is something of an art form.

The Mountain Goats’ ‘Goths’ Builds on Under-Explored Elements of Their Musical and Personal Pasts.

By David Winlo

Search for ‘The Mountain Goats’ on the internet and you’ll find all the images and information you’d expect to find about the well-balanced, mountain-dwelling animals, but you’ll also discover a band, still surprisingly unknown after more than 20 years of music-making, who have just released their sixteenth studio album, entitled ‘Goths’.

Continue reading The Mountain Goats’ ‘Goths’ Builds on Under-Explored Elements of Their Musical and Personal Pasts.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Review: Does it Live Up to the First?

By Natalie Froome

The second instalment of James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy has been long awaited, but it was worth it. In ‘Vol.2’ The band of unlikely heroes are back again, saving the galaxy from a threat that’s much closer to home.

Continue reading Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Review: Does it Live Up to the First?

On the edge or cutting edge? What does UEA think of the new library statue?

By Natalie Froome

UEA have hit the headlines with the controversial placing of a new Anthony Gormley statue.

The art installation is a human statue, which has been placed on the very edge of the library roof. Some are calling the statue ‘edgy’ and think it a great addition to UEA’s sculpture trail, while others have berated the University for their bad taste.

We talked to UEA Students to get the picture of what students think about it… Continue reading On the edge or cutting edge? What does UEA think of the new library statue?

Art forms, Storytelling and Video Games

By Ewa Giera 

As we all know, storytelling has been around for a pretty long time. Over the years, it’s moved on from oral tradition, early forms of written, phonetic English, Shakespeare, over to the modern novel and short stories, and as some seem to believe, ending at film. However, the public is largely split over whether film is the endgame for artistic storytelling or whether there’s something more waiting for us to get noticed.

Continue reading Art forms, Storytelling and Video Games

Taking Back Sunday Concert Review

By Jessica Foulger

Taking Back Sunday continue to impress the world with their music, and Norwich is no exception, as they conquer the UEA’s LCR.

Despite the show not selling out, Taking Back Sunday perform with the same youthful angst and zest that made them so infectious and lovable back in the early 2000s. It is safe to say I have revisited my teenage, ‘I hate the world’ self, whilst finding my older, more reflective self, deeply appreciating Taking Back Sunday’s recent, more mature artistry.

The five-piece from Long Island, New York are touring the UK and Europe in support of the 2016 release ‘Tidal Wave’ which sees them continue a more Rock/Pop sound with occasional heavy hooks whilst retaining melodic guitar riffs. It is a more mature, refined sound, with honest lyrics. The set opens with the fiery opening track ‘Deathwolf’, off their latest release. A perfect opening track with punchy guitar riffs that excite an eager audience, as lead singer Adam Lazarra screams the lyric ‘had a little bit and we want some more.’ Yes, Adam, we certainly want some more! It is clear TBS have so much more to offer in the world of rock music, with Adam’s lyrics as painfully honest in nature as they once were at the commercial peak of their career a decade ago but also possessing a contemplative and nostalgic quality. This is a band that aren’t ready to hang up the mic just yet.

Their set is a balanced mix of old and new and a couple songs in, the band get the crowd moshing and headbanging with ‘A decade under the Influence’ with the crowd screaming ‘anyone will do tonight’ right back at Lazarra and co. The nostalgia of the older tracks electrifies the LCR as fans revel in the pop-punk stage in Taking Back Sunday’s career. The band return to the new tunes with ‘All Excess’, a bouncy track with a damn catchy chorus, as of course the main purpose of this tour is to promote 2016’s ‘Tidal Wave.’

Lazarra takes a breather mid-set to explain the story behind the ‘Call Came Running’ music video. An anecdote about how his father came to the house to find blood all over Lazarra’s hands, bowing his head saying “Adam what have you done now.’ Lazarra concedes that the joke was funnier the last time he told it, but to be honest, I think the audience just wanted more belters to mosh and dance to. It is an awesome video, though, check it out!

I am thrilled that the band performed my personal favourite track off their 2014 release ‘Happiness Is’ entitled ‘Better Homes and Better Gardens.’ Lazarra becomes reflective about the meaning of the song admitting that it is emotional and hard-going to perform live. It is about his divorce during the writing of the record which becomes more real and hard-hitting, with the opening line of the track, ‘when you took that ring off.’ Despite the deeply personal and emotional nature of the song, it shows how mature Lazarra’s song-writing has become. This isn’t the same teenage pop-punk band that sung merely about girls, sex and friendship, but a wiser and older band that have experienced life and the turbulence of adulthood and fatherhood. The lyrics are beautiful; the guitars are raw.

As the set draws to a close, the band perform possibly the two most recognised and nostalgic Taking Band Sunday songs. Of course, the crowd pleasers are essential, but one tipsy bloke bellows throughout the whole set ‘MIAMI…MIAMI’, to a point where I feel like saying, mate, I’ve googled the setlist and there’s no Miami, I’m sorry. Anyway, when the opening riff to ‘Cute without the E’ kicks in, I can’t help but delve into the mosh pit. This song brings back so many memories for me and the nostalgia I feel is overwhelming as I and hundreds of others scream ‘And will you tell all your friends you’ve got your gun to my head.’ The set closes with ‘Makedamnsure’, the quintessential emo pop-punk hit as Lazarra yelps the sassy ‘I just wanna bring you down so badly’, executing his trademark microphone twist to perfection.

Well, boys, you’ve certainly brought down the LCR.

Image: “Adam Lazzara” by Dan is licensed under the CC BY-ND 2.0.

Netflix Originals Reviews: A Series of Unfortunate Events

 

By Gabriela Williams

Following its massive success with Stranger Things, Netflix is adding to its collection of originals with a new TV adaptation of A Series of Unfortunate Events with a set of eight, hour long episodes ready to watch now.

The plot of each episode stays closely to the original plot of the books, unlike the film adaptation released in 2004. The episodes are all split into two parts and are titled The Bad Beginning, The Reptile Room, The Wide Window and The Miserable Mill. In splitting the episodes into these equal parts Netflix has made it very easy to addictively binge watch the whole series in one go. This is perfect for a weekend Netflix binge. The theme tune of the TV series was originally scored by James Newton Howard, famous for the score of The Hunger Games and many others. It does get a bit repetitive and you may well want to skip it before you start singing along.

Neil Patrick Harris plays the villainous Count Olaf, who plots to gain the Baudelaire fortune throughout each episode.  In the process, he disguises himself, sometimes humorously as a scientific assistant, a Captain and a secretary. I thoroughly enjoyed Neil Patrick Harris as Count Olaf and certainly preferred him to Jim Carrey. If I have a favourite character in the series, it’s Count Olaf.

In the final episodes, Dr Orwell is introduced and is closely linked to George Orwell’s novel 1984 and Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. I enjoyed the allusions to these books and was haunted by the timing of the references to 1984 and the similarities in modern society. The other episodes have quirky references to literature as well as many unanswered questions about strands of the plot. This in turn gets quite frustrating as you passionately watch every episode, with the hope of finding answers. Much like the hope for the Baudelaire’s future, you soon realise that this is not a fairy tale with a happy ending or any of the answers you may want.

I thought that this series was absolutely worth a watch, especially as you can tell that the writers and the directors have tried to appeal to the fans of the original book series. I thought that the series length was just about perfect and that the plots of each episode weren’t too complicated to follow. There’s no gaps in the TV series, so those who haven’t read the books will still be able to follow as well.

Overall, this series on Netflix has the potential to be as popular as Stranger Things but might appeal to the fans of the original books more than anyone else. This was a very entertaining series and I would highly recommend that you invest in the characters, but keep in mind the inevitable sad and gloomy ending. Its overly negative storyline might be too disheartening for some and its miserable theme may open a window into a pessimistic outlook on life, like it did when I watched it.

Image: “A Series of Unfortunate Events” by Claudia Gabriela Marques Vieira is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

Netflix Originals Reviews: How to solve a problem like Luke Cage

By Warren Tutt

 The super strong, steel skinned ‘hero for hire’ of Harlem. This is Netflix’s title character for their newest offering for their Marvel serial slate, Luke Cage. However, after more than a century of super humans and demigods triumphing over alien attacks and evil scientists, do we really need another thirteen hours of it? Yes, as it would turn out.

 By focusing on the limitations of his powers rather the concrete smashing, bulletproof nature of Luke Cage’s abilities, creator Cheo Hodari Coker finally captures a believable hero. Ditching Cage’s traditional yellow shirt and golden ‘tiara’ allow him to blend into a modern Harlem, balancing protecting the vulnerable from criminals whilst still having to pay rent. Reality constantly being re-established by Luke’s annoyance at having to buy new clothes every time someone thinks shooting him will have any impact on him.

 With great effect a whole ensemble of supporting characters are given the time and imagination to develop as individuals. A family of corrupt business owners and politicians lead the onslaught to keep Harlem under a tight grip whilst detective Misty Knights deals with the consequences of an exploited police force. Perhaps learning a lesson from predecessor Jessica Jones, female characters in the drama are given more screen time than any Marvel product before. If there’s one think bullet-proof skin can’t protect you from, its the colliding of strong, un-alterable female characters who will do anything for what they believe in.

 After the success of Daredevil and Jessica Jones, Luke Cage is another step before the next instalment Iron Fist, released early this year, sets the franchise up for The Defenders. Hoping to match the popularity of The Avengers, Netflix and Marvel will combine all the heroes of New York to form another super hero team up. Here’s hoping Cage keeps his individual flavour and style and isn’t wrestled into comic book spandex!

Image: “Luke Cage” by Miguel Angel Aranda is licensed under the Public Domain.

The Science of Christmas

 

By Luke Farnish and David Winlo

It’s that time of year again. Secret Santas are being set up, house Christmas dinners being planned, and many a slightly frozen student is heading to Unio for a seasonal hot drink. In other words, it is December, and Christmas will soon be upon us. Here at The Broad we celebrate Christmas in various ways, and we scientists are no different. So here is a scientific explanation of some, if not all things Christmas.

Continue reading The Science of Christmas

UEA Society Spotlight: Egg Box

By Tony Allen and Olivia Minnock

As a society, Egg Box began in 2015 as the less intriguingly titled ‘UEA Publishers’. We started off having two distinct sections dealing with the experience of the professional publishing process, such as publishing the annual Undergraduate Creative Writing Anthology, self-publishing and the “fun” side of print, like holding Zine workshops.

So why Egg Box? Originally, Egg Box was an independent publisher as part of UEA’s publishing project, which worked in partnership with students to publish the annual anthologies among other works. It was run by UEA’s very own lecturers, Nathan Hamilton and Philip Langeskov, with the help of students in editing. However, they were keen to hand more of this over to students, to give us an opportunity and to breathe new life into the label.

And that’s exactly what we did.

We rebranded Egg Box, with a funky new logo and style, and amalgamated it with the original society so members could be part of both.

This also meant that we could work more closely as a society with both the professional side and the self-publishing side being sold together at markets, readings and on our brand new website! As the start of a new generation on an existing label, we’ve inherited a large following and the help of those more experienced than us. This pairs with the creativity and enthusiasm offered by students to balance out the original and dynamic with the established and respectable. We hope that this will enable us to organise more successful careers and publishing events as well as increase the sales and exposure for anyone who wants to get published!

As a society as well as a business, Egg Box publishing hopes to include each and every student at UEA who might be interested in the publishing industry. Whether you’re hoping to boost your CV and get an internship, or you’ve got some artwork or writing knocking about that you want to put into a booklet, we’re here to help.

So what are we up to at the moment? Tony, our new Union rep, explains why he loves being a part of Egg Box:

“Perhaps the best thing about Egg Box is the freedom to express yourself in print in whatever way you wish. The society as a whole produces a collaborative monthly zine on a broad theme (our first was on ‘maps’, we are currently putting the final touches to our Christmas edition). Under these themes, submissions are welcomed of any format, for example poetry, creative writing, illustrations, photography or any other type of art.

All are welcome in Egg Box, and the diversity of work produced by the society means that there is something that everyone can get involved with, be it contributing, editing, designing, marketing or selling.

In addition to the collaborative zine, and sessions to guide submissions organised by our brilliant workshop co-ordinator Emma, the society also assists people with any aspect of self-publishing and printing or preparation for a career in the industry. For example, help and advice is available for those wishing to create and sell their own publications. We regularly sell our wares, for example at the recent ‘student pop-up market’ in the Hive, and will be attending the Christmas market there too. As well as selling the collaborative zines, this is also a platform to sell individual society members’ own self-printed publications too!

A big part of our work is centred around the creation of chapbooks, containing the writing of students, and we have now also taken responsibility for editing and publishing the end-of-year undergraduate creative writing anthology. Submissions have just opened for this and we can’t wait to start sorting through them all!

The society organises lots of social events to inspire the would-be publishers and printers of tomorrow. For example, I recently took part in a visit to the On Paper festival which showcased some of the best printers and graphic artists in the world, right here in Norwich.

Egg Box enjoy collaborating with other societies too. We have recently completed a joint publication entitled ‘PROMPT’ with Octarine, the UEA’s creative writing periodical. In the past we have collaborated with both the Feminist and Creative Writing societies. If you are interested in finding out more, or your society is interested in working with us, please drop us an email to ueapubsoc@gmail.com!”

We hope to hear from you or see you at our office hours, 12.00-2-30pm in Unio every Wednesday.